HomeNewsFG Admits to ₦5.4 Trillion Oil Subsidy in 2024 After Countless Denials

FG Admits to ₦5.4 Trillion Oil Subsidy in 2024 After Countless Denials

Published on

In a surprising turn of events, the Nigerian government has admitted to spending ₦5.4 trillion on oil subsidies in 2024, following numerous denials. This revelation has sparked widespread debate about the sustainability of such subsidies and their impact on the nation’s economy.

For months, the government had consistently denied reports of substantial spending on oil subsidies. However, recent disclosures have confirmed the staggering amount, prompting calls for a re-evaluation of the subsidy program. The admission has raised questions about the government’s transparency and fiscal management.

Minister of Finance, Zainab Ahmed, acknowledged the expenditure in a press briefing, citing the need to cushion the impact of rising global oil prices on domestic fuel costs. “We have been working to protect our citizens from the full brunt of global oil market fluctuations,” Ahmed stated. “However, the cost of maintaining these subsidies has become unsustainable.”

The subsidy program aims to keep fuel prices affordable for Nigerians, a crucial consideration in a country where many people rely on petroleum products for daily living. Despite its intentions, the program has been criticized for draining national resources and fostering inefficiencies within the oil sector.

Economists and industry experts have expressed concerns about the long-term implications of maintaining such high subsidy levels. “Spending ₦5.4 trillion on subsidies in a single year is a significant fiscal burden,” said Dr. Bismarck Rewane, a leading economist. “This expenditure diverts funds from critical sectors like education, healthcare, and infrastructure, which are essential for sustainable development.”

The subsidy controversy is not new in Nigeria. Previous administrations have grappled with the challenge of balancing subsidy payments with fiscal responsibility. The latest figures indicate that the current subsidy regime is among the most expensive in the nation’s history, raising alarms about its viability.

Public reaction to the government’s admission has been mixed. While some Nigerians appreciate the efforts to keep fuel prices stable, others argue that the funds could be better utilized to address systemic issues in the energy sector. “Subsidies are a short-term solution,” commented Nnimmo Bassey, an environmental activist. “What we need is a comprehensive strategy to develop our local refining capacity and reduce dependency on imported fuel.”

In response to the backlash, the government has announced plans to review the subsidy program and explore more sustainable alternatives. This includes initiatives to boost local refining capacity, which could reduce the need for imported petroleum products and associated subsidies. The government is also considering targeted subsidies for vulnerable populations to ensure that support reaches those who need it most.

“We are committed to finding a balanced approach that addresses the needs of our citizens while ensuring fiscal sustainability,” Ahmed affirmed. “Our goal is to transition to a more efficient system that supports economic growth and stability.”

The admission of the ₦5.4 trillion subsidy expenditure underscores the complex interplay between social welfare and economic management in Nigeria. As the government navigates this delicate balance, the focus remains on developing long-term solutions that can provide lasting benefits for the country’s economy and its people.

The road ahead for Nigeria’s subsidy program will require careful planning and robust policy reforms. Stakeholders are calling for greater transparency and accountability in subsidy management, as well as a clear vision for the future of Nigeria’s energy sector.

Source: BusinessDay.ng

Latest articles

Okupe Claims Obi Betrayed Atiku, Cuts Ties With Him

Okupe criticizes Obi's decision to leave PDP and run for president, accusing him of betrayal and exposing political rifts in Nigeria.

Wrong Diagnosis Leading to Patient Deaths in Nigerian Hospitals

Rising misdiagnoses in Nigerian hospitals lead to preventable deaths, prompting calls for urgent reforms in training, technology, and diagnostic protocols.

Nigeria Reports 22 Building Collapses, 33 Deaths, Urges Immediate Action

Nigeria faces a surge in building collapses, with 22 incidents in 2024. COREN calls for urgent action and collaboration to address the crisis.

Tinubu’s N100,000 Wage Blocked by Governors

The NLC Lagos Council criticizes the new N70,000 minimum wage as inadequate for Lagos workers, citing high living costs and governors' influence on the decision.

More like this

Okupe Claims Obi Betrayed Atiku, Cuts Ties With Him

Okupe criticizes Obi's decision to leave PDP and run for president, accusing him of betrayal and exposing political rifts in Nigeria.

Wrong Diagnosis Leading to Patient Deaths in Nigerian Hospitals

Rising misdiagnoses in Nigerian hospitals lead to preventable deaths, prompting calls for urgent reforms in training, technology, and diagnostic protocols.

Nigeria Reports 22 Building Collapses, 33 Deaths, Urges Immediate Action

Nigeria faces a surge in building collapses, with 22 incidents in 2024. COREN calls for urgent action and collaboration to address the crisis.